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Magnificent birding in Botswana and Zimbabwe

Botswana - Zimbabwe Overland tour: August/September 1996

Article and photos by Lynette Oxley

A Meyer's Parrot & Green pigeon at Oddball's Palm Island Luxury Lodge in the Okavango Delta

One of the highlights of our three week overland trip to Botswana and Zimbabwe was the prolific birdlife experienced. From the pretty duets of the Swamp Boubous in the Okavango Delta and the Linyanti swamps (Chobe National Park) to the baby-like cries of the Trumpeter hornbills on the mighty Zambezi which produced a birding extravaganza not to be forgotten for a very long time.

Our first overnight spot was at Nata on the edge of the Makgadikgadi Reserve. Nata Lodge is an ideal birding spot and encourages birds to visit a feeding tray close to the dining room and bar. We saw a variety of birds visit this tray the next morning before breakfast including an Acacia Acacia Pied Barbet (Tricholaema leucomelas/Lybius leucomelas), a very tame Yellowbilled Hornbill (Tockus Flavirostris/Tockus leucomelas) A, Glossy Starlings (Loprotornis nitens), Steelblue Widowfinches (Vidua chalybeata) and African Redeyed Bulbuls (Pycnonotus nigricans). They have also compiled a comprehensive bird list for a 20 kilometre radius which are made available to visitors at the Lodge.

Yellowbilled and Redbilled Hornbills (Tockus erythrorhynchus) were seen in great numbers throughout our trip in Botswana with the Grey Hornbill (Tockus nasutus) seen less frequently.

Driving through the Makgadikgadi Reserve and Nxai Pans on our way to Gweta we encountered a variety of birds next to the road. This helped to break the monotony of the trip and included the beautiful Pintailed Whydah (Vidua macroura), the colourful Lilacbreasted Roller (Coracias caudata), the Southern Whitecrowned Shrike (Eurocephalus anguitimens), Meve's Longtailed Starlings (Lamprotornis mevisii), Forktail Drongos (Dicrurus adsimilis) and the Blackbellied Korhaan (Eupodotis melangaster). The first time I saw the Meve's Longtailed Starling I was amazed by the birds wonderful colours and its quant group behaviour. We saw large numbers of these birds throughout Botswana. The Southern Whitecrowned Shrike is a large robust bird and is the only shrike in the region which have a white crown and forehead. We saw groups of five to six of these birds in small bushes next to the road.

The afternoon and morning spent at Gweta only produced a few Pied Crows (Corvus albus) and we went on to Maun from where we flew into Oddball's's Palm Island Luxury Lodge in the Okavango Delta. Birding in the Delta is absolutely fantastic.

We were greeted at our camping site at Oddball's's by a beautiful Swamp Boubou (Laniarius bicolor) duet. One bird calls with a whistle while the other one answers with a rattling sound. The bird who whistles' whole throat expands with the effort of the call. These birds provided hours of pleasure for us during the trip.

We saw a wide variety of birds at Oddball's camp itself as well as during our mokoro (dugout canoe) trip into the Delta. Our first and last nights were spent at Oddball's while one night was spent camping on one of the island in the Delta itself. The mokoro polers/guides have a reasonable to good knowledge of the birds in the Delta and can be used as a first reference source. Language and pronunciation sometimes causes problems with identification.

At Oddball's camp we saw African Mourning Doves (Streptopelia decipiens/Casmerodius albus), Crested Barbet (Trachyphonus vaillantii) [Picture on the left - A Crested Barbet ruffled by the wind], Blackcollared Barbets (Lybius torquatus), Green Pigeons (Treron calva), Meyer's Parrots (Poicephalus meyeri), Meve's Longtailed Starlings, Greater Blue-eared Starlings (Lamprotornis chalybaeus), Greenspotted/Emeraldspotted Doves (Turtur chalcospilos) and Blackeyed Bulbuls (Pycnonotus barbatus).

The sad but beautiful calls (kur-r-r-r-r-r-r) of the African Mourning Dove (Streptopelia decipiens/Casmerodius albus) greeted us every morning at sunrise and as well as saying goodnight at sunset. African Mourning Doves is the only collared dove with a totally grey head, yellow eye and distinctive red eye-ring.

A couple of African Green Pigeons (Treron calva) [Picture on left: A good view of the white tip on the Green Pigeon's beak] and Meyer's Parrots (Poicephalus meyeri) were also "clowning" around on a dead tree stump covered with a creeper right in front of the Oddball's verandah and provided hours of pleasure. Both the green pigeons and the parrots were, at times, hanging upside-down [Picture on the right: A Meyer's Parrot hanging upside down] while feeding. Green pigeons are the only green pigeon in the region and appears very parrot-like with its bright colours and very parrot-like behaviour. The Meyer's parrots were also perching conspicuously on this dead tree stump and the behaviour was very similar to those of the green pigeons.

A Greenspotted/Emeraldspotted Dove (Turtur chalcospilos) also briefly visited the bare ground in front of the Oddball's verandah (where the mokoros leave from) but were extremely shy. The green spots on the wings are very conspicuous when the sunlight fall on it.

On our mokoro trip we encountered a wide variety of water and other birdlife including big groups of Wattled Cranes (Grus carunculata), Spurwing Goose (Plectropterus gambensis), African Jacana (Actophilornis africanus), Blacksmith Plovers (Vanellus armatus), Black Crake (Amaurornis flavirostris), Goliath Heron (Ardea goliath), Squacco Heron (Ardeola ralloides), Little Bee-eaters (Merops Pusillus), Little Egret (Egretta garzetta), Great White Egret (Egretta alba/Casmerodius albus), Coppertail Coucal (Centropus cupreicaudus), Senegal/Fleck's Coucal (Centropus senegalensis), African Fish Eagle (Haliaeetus vocifer), Lilacbreasted Rollers (Coracias caudata), Pied Kingfisher (Ceryle rudis), Heuglin's Robin (Cossypha heuglini), Lapettfaced Vultures (Torgos tracheliotus), African Longtailed Shrike (Corvinella melanoleuca), Arrowmarked Babbler (Turdoides jardineii), as well as the other birds also seen at the Lodge itself.

Birdwatching on mokoros is extremely relaxing and this quite mode of transport provides one with an ideal opportunity to get close to the birds. The mokoro polers/guides also have an excellent knowledge of the Delta, and knows the good birding spots and where to find particular birds.

Picture above: Large numbers of Wattled Cranes in flight

We saw the Wattled Cranes in big groups, always with a couple of Spurwing Geese and speculated on the possibility of a symbiotic relationship between these birds. The Wattled Cranes were extremely wary and we couldn't get very close to these groups. When our mokoros approached the Wattled Cranes, also sometimes in the company of Red Lechwe, the birds and buck took of rapidly with a great noise in the air as well as in the water.

Picture above: Taking flight: Wattled Cranes and Red Lechwe flee from the approaching Mokoros

At our campsite on one of the islands we spotted a variety of small forest birds as well as Arrowmarked Babblers and Meve's Longtailed Starlings. During our siesta time, the afternoon after setting up camp, I watched a Heuglin's Robin hopping and feeding around on the ground in the dense riverine thickets. This bird's song has variable crescendo phrases starting with soft notes, becoming harder and faster and then ending suddenly. The song sounds like "it's-up-to-you, it's-up-to-you, up-to you, UP-TO-YOU" or "think-of-it, think-of-it, THINK-OF-IT". According to Robert's this bird is one of the best avian singers in the world. Sometimes these birds sing in duet and are also good mimics of other birds.

Another experience worth mentioning happened on our way back to Oddball's in the Mokoros. The Mokoro polers/guides took some leftover fresh fish from our black bream breakfast which they threaded with reeds to make it float. They literally then called some African Fish Eagles that swooped down in front of our Mokoros to retrieve the fish.

After Oddball's we flew back to Maun from where we started our journey to Third Bridge in Moremi Wildlife Reserve. On our way we passed a great number of small groups of Kurrichane Buttonquail (Turnix sylvatica) scratching in the dry leaves and grass next to the road. Their call is a deep hooting "hoom-hoom-hoom" at 2 second intervals. This very small quail walks slowly on tiptoes with jerky steps and the body rocks forwards and backwards. As elsewhere in Botswana we saw large numbers of Yellowbilled and Redbilled Hornbills. These comical birds become very tame around the camp and one particular bird visited us every day at our campsite at Third Bridge.

Third Bridge produced some of our best birding of the trip. This included Marabou Storks (Leptoptilos crumeniferus), Blue Waxbill (Uraeginthus angolensis) [Picture on the right: A Blue Waxbill in Moremi Game Reserve], Namaqua doves (Oena capensis), Harlaub's Babblers (Turdoides hartlaubii), Arrowmarked Babbler (Turdoides jardineii), Crimsonbreasted Shrikes (Laniarius attroccineus), Pinbacked Pelicans (Pelecanus rufescens), Longtailed Shrikes (Cornvinella melanoleuca), African Spoonbills (Platalea alba), Ground Hornbills (Bucorvus leadbeateri), Yellowbilled Storks (Mycteria ibis), Helmeted Guineafowl (Numida meleagris), Grey Louries (Corythaixoides concolor), Senegal Coucal (Centropus senegalensis), Lilacbreasted Rollers (Coracias caudata), Redbilled Woodhoopoes (Phoeniculus purpureus), African Hoopoe (Upupa africana/Upupa epops) and Blackcollared Barbet's (Lybius torquatus).

On the road from our campsite to the ablution blocks at Third Bridge we saw large groups of Blue Waxbills and always at a particular spot a Crimsonbreasted Shrike foraging on the ground. Blue Waxbills always have an urgent, busy call note and the birds around the campsite were quite tame.

On one game viewing excursion at Third Bridge my attention was drawn to the shrill piping calls ("tlee-teeooo) of several Longtailed Shrikes [Picture on the left: A couple of Longtailed Shrikes close to Mokushumu pans in Moremi Game Reserve] sitting at the top of a bush.

Later that day coming back towards Third Bridge we also had the privilege of seeing a Marabou Stork [Picture on the right:: A Marabou Stork at Labala Pan in Moremi], a pair of Pinbacked Pelicans, an African Spoonbill and a Yellowbilled Stork at Labala Pan just before Third Bridge.

The Marabou Stork is a large, unusual looking bird and the bird that we saw was standing still for long periods, not very active at all. These storks are mostly scavengers but sometimes forages for insects in grasslands. Diet is quite interesting and according to Robert's includes carrion, refuse, rodents, insects, birds (includes quelea and even adult flamingo), fish (up to 450 grams), young crocodiles, lizards, snakes and frogs. Another interesting fact about this bird is that defecates on its legs to regulate its body temperature and this usually makes the legs seem white. [Picture on the left: Note the white on the legs of this Marabou Stork in Moremi]

It was also unusual to see a solitary Yellowbilled Stork [Picture on the right: A juvenile Yellowbilled Stork at Labala Pan in Moremi Game Reserve] in this group, because these birds usually occurs in groups. We also saw a solitary African Spoonbill [Picture on the right: An African Spoonbill at Labala Pan in Moremi Game Reserve] which derived their names from the distinctive shape of their bills. It wades in swallow water while sweeping this spoonlike bill from side to side sifting for food.



Pinbacked Pelicans are large greyish birds and usually forages singly or in pairs (not in co-ordinated groups) like the birds in the picture are doing. They eat fish up to 400 grams but their prey is usually smaller than that of the White Pelican (Pelecanus onocrotalus). [Picture on the left: A pair of Pinbacked Pelicans at Labala Pan in Moremi Game Reserve - late afternoon]. Breeding takes place in Northern Botswana as well as Lake St Lucia from June to January in large breeding colonies.



Our next stop was Savuti in the Chobe National Park where the highlight of our visit was the two juvenile Barred Owls (Glaucidium capense) [Picture on the right: A Barred Owl against a backdrop of ligth in Savuti] we saw close to our camp. This is a small owl with no eartufts. Two ladies in our camp was alerted to their presence by their repeated high-pitched calls of purr purr piu piu piu piu which rises in volume which sounds somewhat like a Cape Turtle dove. There are also a 2-sullabled slightly trilled prr-purr, prr-purr sound followed by a soft twoo, twoo, twoo.

A Barred Owl staring at the photographer


We also saw a Kori Bustard (Ardeotis kori) and a Stanley's Bustard (Neotis denhami) on one of our game drives. The Kori Bustard [Picture on the left: A Kori Bustard in the grassplanes of Savuti] is the largest bustard in the Southern Africa region and the male is the world's heaviest flying bird. In some part of their range bee-eaters eat insects from the back of these birds. Stanley's Bustard is very shy and wary and walks away quickly when disturbed.


The next stop in the Chobe National Park was the Linyanti swamps which forms the border between Botswana and Namibia and after the dusty dry Savuti the call of the Swamp Boubou next to the Linyanti river rejuvenated me. A variety of birds were seen here including the Little Bee-eater (Merops pusillus), Namaqua dove (Oena capensis), Emeraldspotted/Greenspotted Dove (Turtur chalcospilos), Redbilled Quelea (Quelea quelea), Greater Blue-eared Starlings (Lamprotornis chalybaeus), Arrowmarked Babblers (Turdoides jardineii), Coqui Francolin (Francolinus coqui), Golden Weavers (Ploceus xanthops) and Blackeyed Bulbuls (Pycnonotus barbatus).


The Crested Francolin is a small francolin and has a distinct capped appearance and a broad white eybrow stripe which, combined with its freckled neck and breast, distinguish it. When agitated it raises its crest and cocks its tail like a bantan, and is the only francolin to do so. [Picture above: A Crested Francolin in Linyanti swamps (Chobe National Park).


Next to the Linyanti river we saw big groups of Greater Blue-eared Starlings and Arrowmarked Babblers. [Picture above: An Arrowmarked Babbler foraging at Linyanti swamps] Both types of birds are characterful birds with bold mannerisms. Arrowmarked Babblers are very noisy birds and their calls are a nasal whirring crescendo with many birds calling 'ra-ra-ra-ra' or a harsh 'chak-chak-chak-chak'. They are usually in big noisy groups and forages on the ground, jumping and clambering through the undergrowth rustling the leaves as they go. We saw large numbers of these birds around our Linyanti campsite. Greater Blue-eared Starlings are also very gregarious and also forages by running about on the ground. [Picture on the left: A Greater Blue-eared Starling scractchin in the dry grass: Linyanti swamps]


The Golden Weaver is a beautiful colourful bird and is uncommon resident and the particular bird in the photo was found next to the Linyanti river.


We also saw a pair of Little Bee-eaters waiting for insects on the same bush behind our tent and sometimes even in the camps rubbish tip. This is the smallest of the Bee-eaters in the region and they usually hawks insects from a perch. [See pictures above and right] A Bearded Woodpecker (Thripias namaquus) were also spotted hammering at a small tree next to the Linyanti river while large numbers of Rebilled Quelea (Quelea quelea) also gathered in the late afternoon with a flurry of activity.

From Linyanti we took the cutline road up to the main road to Kachikau and Kasane from where we went through to Victoria Falls in Zimbabwe. On the mighty Zambezi river we saw and heard a variety of birds of which the sighting of African Skimmers (Rynchops flavirostris) were the highlight. We saw a big group of these birds during an one day canoe safari, north of Victoria Falls. This tern-like bird has a large red bill, with the lower jaw much longer than the upper. These birds are extremely wary and not easily approached. We got relatively close to them because of our silent mode of transport in the canoes. They feed by flying over the water with the lower jaw dipped just below the surface of the water and cutting a narrow wake. The bird then returns on the same course and snaps the bill closed as the food is swept up.

Other birds seen on the Zambezi river included Whitebreasted (Great) Cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo), Reed Cormorant (Phalacrocorax africanus), Darters (Anhinga melanogaster), Goliath Heron (Ardea goliath), Great White Egret (Casmerodius albus/Egretta Alba), Greenbacked Heron (Butorides striatus), Hamerkop (Scopus umbretta), Oppenbilled Storks (Anastomus lamelligerus), Sacred Ibis (Threskiornis aethiopicus), Egyptian Goose (Alopochen aegyptiacus), Yellowbilled Kites (Milvus aegyptius/Milvus migrans), Black Crake (Amaurornis flavirostris), Whitecrowned Plovers (Vanellus albiceps), Water Dikkop (Burhinus vermiculatus), Pygmy Kingfishers (Ispidina picta), Pied Kingfishers (Ceryle rudis), Giant Kingfishers (Ceryle maxima), Malachite Kingfisher (Alcedo cristata), Brownhooded Kingfisher (Halcyon albiventris/Halcyon leucocephala), Little Bee-eater (Merops pusillus), Whitefronted Bee-eater (Merops bullockoides), Trumpeter Hornbill (Bycanistes bucinator), Blackcollored Barbets (Lybius torquatus), Black-eyed Bulbul (Pyconotus barbatus layardi), African Jacana (Actophilornis africanus), African Fish Eagle (Haliaeetus vocifer) and African Pied Wagtails (Motacilla aguimp).

The Trumpeter Hornbill (Bycanistes bucinator) is similar to the Siverycheeked Hornbill (Bycanistes brevis) but in smaller proportions. We heard the baby-like cries of the bird throughout our stay in Victoria Falls. The call is a combination of braying, laughing, trumpeting (from there the name), squealing and wailing in a rapid staccato. These calls often take place in groups, espcially at dawn and dusk.

Another interesting bird was the only all-black Stork in the region namely the Openbilled Stork. The bill is large with a distinct gap in the middle and is used to grasp mollusc shells and then the lower jaw is used and inserted into the snail shell to extract the content. We saw large numbers of these birds next to the Zambezi river and on small islands in the middle of the river.

The best birding at Victoria Falls is done on canoes (either canoe safaris - one or multi day or Royal Drifts) because with this mode of transport one can get quite close to the birds without disturbing them. For example we got very close to Water Dikkop which were nesting on the little islands on the river. This bird is quite vocal during the day although it is mostly crepuscular and nocturnal.

A trip into the Okavango Delta, Moremi Game Reserve, Chobe National Park and Victoria Falls is well worth it. For organised general overland tours covering these areas please see our Drifters page. For canoeing on the Zambezi please see our Frontiers and Shearwater pages.

A Comprehensive list of the birds seen on our Botswana/Zimbabwe trip

August/September 1996

Common Name
Scientific name
Places seen

(in and around the specific places)
Country
Arrowmarked Babbler Turdoides jardineii 1)Third Bridge (Moremi Game Reserve)

2)Savuti (Chobe National Park)

3)Linyanti swamps (Chobe National Park)

4)Oddball's Palm Island Luxury Lodge (Okavango Delta)

Botswana
Hartlaub's Babbler Turdoides harlaubii 1) Third Bridge (Moremi Wildlife Reserve) Botswana
Blackcollared Barbet Lybius torquatus 1) Nata Lodge (Nata)

2) Oddball's Palm Island Luxury Lodge (Okavango Delta)

3) Third Bridge (Moremi Game Reserve)

Botswana
1) Victoria Falls Zimbabwe
Crested Barbet Trachyphonus vaillantii 1) Oddball's Palm Island Luxury Lodge (Okavango Delta) Botswana
Pied (Acacia) Barbet Tricholaema leucomelas

Lybeus leucomelas

1) Nata Lodge (Nata) Botswana
Little Bee-eater Merops pusillus 1) Linyanti swamps (Chobe National Park) Botswana
1) Victoria falls Zimbabwe
Whitefronted Bee-eater Merops bullockoides 1) Victoria falls Zimbabwe
Swamp Boubou Laniarius bicolor 1) Oddball's Palm Island Luxury Lodge (Okavango Delta)

2) Linyanti Swamps (Chobe National Park)

Botswana
African Redeyed Bulbul Pycnonotus nigricans 1) Nata Lodge (Nata)

2) Linyanti Swamps (Chobe National Park)

Botswana
Blackeyed (common) Bulbul Pycnonotus barbatus 1) Nata Lodge (Nata)

2) Linyanti Swamps (Chobe National Park)

Botswana
Kori Bustard Ardeotis kori 1) Third Bridge (Moremi Game Reserve)

2) Savuti (Chobe National Park)

Botswana
Stanley's Bustard Neotis denhami 1) Third Bridge (Moremi Game Reserve)

2) Savuti (Chobe National Park)

Botswana
Kurrichane (small) Buttonquail Turnix sylvatica 1) Third Bridge (Moremi Game Reserve) Botswana
Reed Cormorant Phalacrocorax africanus 1) Victoria Falls Zimbabwe
Whitebreasted (great) Cormorant Phalacrocorax carbo 1) Victoria Falls Zimbabwe
Coppertailed Coucal Centropus cupreicaudus 1) Oddball's Palm Island Luxury Lodge (Okavango Delta) Botswana
Senegal Coucal Centropus senegalensis 1) Oddball's Palm Island Luxury Lodge (Okavango Delta)

2) Third Bridge (Moreme Game Reserve)

Botswana
Black Crake Amaurornis flavirostris 1) Oddball's Palm Island Luxury Lodge (Okavango Delta) Botswana
1) Victoria Falls Zimbabwe
Wattled Crane Grus carunculata 1) Oddball's Palm Island Luxury Lodge (Okavango Delta)

2) Third Bridge (Moremi Game Reserve)

Botswana
Pied Crow Corvus albus 1) Nata Lodge (Nata)

2) Third Bridge (Moremi Game Reserve)

3) Maun

4) Savuti (Chobe National Park)

Botswana
1) Victoria Falls Zimbabwe
African Darter Anhinga melanogaster 1) Victoria Falls Zimbabwe
Water Dikkop Burhinus vermiculatus 1) Victoria Falls Zimbabwe
African Mourning Dove Streptopelia decipiens 1) Oddball's Palm Island Luxury Lodge (Okavango Delta)

2) Linyanti Swamps (Chobe National Park)

Botswana
Cape Turtle Dove Streptopelia capicola 1) Nata Lodge (Natal)

2) Linyanti Swamps (Chobe National Park)

Botswana
1) Victoria Falls Zimbabwe
Greenspotted

/Emeraldspotted

Dove Turtur chalcospilos 1) Oddball's Palm Island Luxury Lodge (Okavango Delta)

2) Linyanti swamps (Chobe National Park)

Botswana
Laughing (Palm) Dove Streptopelia sengalensis 1) Linyanti swamps (Chobe National Park) Botswana
1) Victoria Falls Zimbabwe
Namaqua Dove Oena capensis 1) Third Bridge (Moremi Game Reserve)

2) Savuti (Chobe National Park)

3) Oddball's Palm Island Luxury Lodge (Okavango Delta)

Botswana
Forktailed Drongo Dicrurus adsimilis 1) Third Bridge (Moremi Game Reserve)

2) Savuti (Chobe National Park)

3) Linyanti swamps (Chobe National Park)

4) Oddball's Palm Island Luxury Lodge (Okavango Delta)

Botswana
African Fish Eagle Haliaeetus vocifer 1) Oddball's Palm Island Luxury Lodge (Okavango Delta) Botswana
1) Victoria Falls Zimbabwe
Great white Egret Casmerodius albus

Egretta alba

1) Oddball's Palm Island Luxury Lodge (Okavango Delta) Botswana
1) Victoria Falls Zimbabwe
Little Egret Egretta garzetta 1) Oddball's Palm Island Luxury Lodge (Okavango Delta) Botswana
Jameson's Firefinch Lagonosticta rhodopareia 1) Third Bridge (Moremi Game Reserve) Botswana
Redbilled Firefinch Lagonosticta senegala 1) Third Bridge (Moremi Game Reserve) Botswana
Coqui Francolin Francolinus coqui 1) Linyanti swamps (Chobe National Park) Botswana
Swainson's Francolin Francolinus swainsonii 1) Linyanti swamps (Chob National Park) Botswana
Spurwinged Goose Plectropterus gambensis 1) Oddball's Palm Island Luxury Lodge (Okavango Delta) Botswana
Egyptian Goose Alopochen aegyptiacus 1) Oddball's Palm Island Luxury Lodge (Okavango Delta) Botswana
1) Victoria Falls Zimbabwe
Helmeted Guineafowl Numida meleagris 1) Third Bridge (Moremi Game Reserve)

2) Savuti (Chobe National Park)

Botswana
Hamerkop Hamerkop Scopus umbretta 1) Victoria Falls Zimbabwe
Goliath Heron Ardea goliath 1) Victoria Falls Zimbabwe
Greenbacked (Striated) Heron Butorides striatus 1) Victoria Falls Zimbabwe
Purple Heron Ardea purpurea 1) Victoria Falls Zimbabwe
Greenbacked (Striated) Heron Butorides striatus 1) Victoria Falls Zimbabwe
Squacco (common) Heron Ardeola ralloides 1) Oddball's Palm Island Luxury Lodge (Okavango Delta) Botswana
African Hoopoe Upupa africana 1) Savuti (Chobe National Park)

2) Third Bridge (Moremi Game Reserve)

Botswana
Grey Hornbill Tockus nasutus 1) Nata Lodge (Nata)

2) Third Bridge (Moremi Game Reserve)

3) Savuti (Chobe National Park)

4) Linyanti swamps (Chobe National Park)

Botswana
Ground Hornbill Bucorvus leadbeateri 1) Third Bridge (Moremi Game Reserve)

2) Savuti (Chobe National Park)

Redbilled Hornbill Tockus erythrorhynchus 1) Nata Lodge (Nata)

2) Third Bridge (Moremi Game Reserve)

3) Savuti (Chobe National Park)

4) Linyanti swamps (Chobe National Park)

Botswana
Trumpeter Hornbill Bycanistes bucinator 1) Victoria Falls Zimbabwe
Yellowbilled (Southern) Hornbill Tockus leucomelas

Tockus albiventris

1) Nata Lodge (Nata)

2) Third Bridge (Moremi Game Reserve)

3) Savuti (Chobe National Park)

4) Linyanti swamps (Chobe National Park)

Botswana
Sacred Ibis Threskiornis aethiopicus 1) Victoria Falls Zimbabwe
African Jacana Actophilornis africanus 1) Oddball's Palm Island Luxury Lodge (Okavango Delta) Botswana
Brownhooded Kingfisher Halcyon leucocephala 1) Victoria Falls Zimbabwe
Giant Kingfisher Ceryle maxima 1) Victoria Falls Zimbabwe
Greyhooded Kingfisher Halcyon leucocephala 1) Oddball's Palm Island Luxury Lodge (Okavango Delta) Botswana
Pied Kingfisher Ceryle rudis 1) Oddball's Palm Island Luxury Lodge (Okavango Delta)

2) Linyanti swamps (Chobe National Park)

Botswana
1) Victoria Falls Zimbabwe
Malachite Kingfisher Alcedo cristata 1) Oddball's Palm Island Luxury Lodge (Okavango Delta) Botswana
1) Victoria Falls Zimbabwe
Pygmy Kingfisher Ispidina picta 1) Oddball's Palm Island Luxury Lodge (Okavango Delta) Botswana
1) Victoria Falls Zimbabwe
Yellowbilled Kite Milvus aegyptius

Milvus migrans

1) Victoria Falls Zimbabwe
Blackbellied Korhaan Eupodotis melanogaster 1) Between Nata & Maun Botswana
Grey Lourie Corythaixoides concolor 1) Third Bridge (Moremi Game Reserve)

2) Savuti (Chobe National Park)

3) Linyanti swamps (Chobe National Park)

Botswana
1) Victoria Falls Zimbabwe
Ostrich Ostrich Struchio camelus 1) Nata Lodge (Nata)

2) Moremi Game Reserve

Botswana
Pearlspotted Owl Glaucidium perlatum 1) Savuti (Chobe National Park) Botswana
Redbilled Oxpecker Buphagus erythrorhunchus 1) Third Bridge (Moremi Game Reserve)

2) Savuti (Chobe National Park)

Botswana
Meyer's Parrot Poicephalus meyeri 1) Oddball's Palm Island Luxury Lodge (Okavango Delta) Botswana
Pinbacked Pelican Pelecanus rufescens 1) Third Bridge (Moremi Game Reserve) Botswana
Green Pigeon Treron calva 1) Odball's Palm Island Luxury Lodge (Okavango Delta) Botswana
Blacksmith Plover Vanellus armatus 1) Oddball's Palm Island Luxury Lodge (Okavango Delta) Botswana
1) Victoria Falls Zimbabwe
Crowned Plover Vanellus coronatus 1) Between Nata and Gweta

2) Third Bridge (Moremi Game Reserve)

Botswana
Whitecrowned Plover Vanellus albiceps 1) Victoria Falls Zimbabwe
Redbilled Quelea Quelea quelea 1) Linyanti swamps (Chobe National Park) Botswana
Heuglin's Robin Cossypha heuglini 1) Oddball's Palm Island Luxury Lodge (Okavango Delta) Botswana
Lilacbreasted Roller Coracias caudata 1) Throughout Botswana
African Longtailed Shrike Corvinella melanoleuca 1) Third Bridge (Moremi Game Reserve)

2) Oddball's Palm Island Luxury Lodge (Okavango Delta)

Botswana
Crimsonbreasted Shrike Laniarius atrococcineus 1) Third Bridge (Moremi Game Reserve) Botswana
Greyheaded Bush Shrike Malaconotus banchoti 1) Linyanti swamps (Chobe National Park) Botswana
Southern Whitecrowned Shrike Eurocephalus anguitimens 1) Nata Lodge (Nata)

2) Between Nata - Gweta and Maun

3) Third Bridge (Moremi Game Reserve)

Botswana
African Skimmer Rhynchops flavirostris 1) Victoria Falls Zimbabwe
African Spoonbill Platalea alba 1) Third Bridge (Moremi Game Reserve) Botswana
Glossy Starling Lamprotornis nitens 1) Nata Lodge (Nata) Botswana
Greater Blue-eared Starling Lamprotornis chalybaeus 1) Oddball's Palm Island Luxury Lodge (Okavango Delta)

2) Linyanti swamps (Chobe National Park)

Botswana
Meve's Longtailed Starling Lamprotornis mevesii 1) Third Bridge (Moremi Game Reserve)

2) Savuti (Chobe National Park)

3) Linyanti swamps (Chobe National Park)

4) Oddball's Palm Island Luxury Lodge (Okavango Delta)

Botswana
African Openbilled Stork Anastomus lamelligerus 1) Victoria Falls Zimbabwe
Saddlebilled Stork Ephippiorhynchus senegalensis 1) Third Bridge (Moremi Game Reserve)

2) Oddball's Palm Island Luxury Lodge (Okavango Delta)

Botswana
Marabou Stork Leptoptilos crumeniferus 1) Third Bridge (Moremi Game Reserve) Botswana
Yellowbilled Stork Mycteria ibis 1) Third Bridge (Moremi Game Reserve)

2) Oddball's Palm Island Luxury Lodge (Okavango Delta)

Botswana
Kurrichane Thrush Turdus libonyana 1) Third Bridge (Moremi Game Reserve)

2) Linyanti swamps (Chobe National Park)

Botswana
Cape Vulture Gyps coprotheres 1) Third Bridge (Moremi Game Reserve) Botswana
Lappetfaced Vulture Torgos tracheliotus 1) Third Bridge (Moremi Game Reserve)

2) Oddballs Palm Island Luxury Lodge (Okavango Delta)

Botswana
Palmnut Vulture Gypohierax angolensis 1) North of Gweta Botswana
African Pied Wagtail Motacilla aguimp 1) Oddball's Palm Island Luxury Lodge (Okavango Delta) Botswana
Cape Wagtail Motacilla capensis 1) Oddball's Palm Island Luxury Lodge (Okavango Delta) Botswana
Blue Waxbill Uraeginthus angolensis 1) Third Bridge (Moremi Game Reserve)

2) Linyanti swamps (Chobe National Park)

Botswana
Golden Weaver Ploceus xanthops 1) Linyanti swamps (Chobe National Park) Botswana
Pintailed Whydah Vidua macroura 1) Makgadikgadi Reserve (on the road) Botswana
Steelblue Widowfinch Vidua chalybeata 1) Nata Lodge (Nata) Botswana
Redbilled Woodhoopoe Phoeniculus purpureus 1) Nata Lodge (Nata) Botswana
Bearded Woodpecker Thripias namaquus 1) Linyanti swamps (Chobe National Park) Botswana

* Areas include a wide kilometre range in and around these places eg. Third Bridge includes a large area in Moremi Game Reserve.

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Drifters 16 Day Overland Tour.